Neolithic Stone Circle Discovered in Cornwall

Cornish HengeBODMIN, ENGLAND—The Cornish Times reports that archaeologists have discovered a previously unknown stone circle within the banks of Castilly Henge, a late Neolithic (ca. 3000–2500 B.C.) earthen enclosure where rituals are believed to have been carried out. Measuring 225 feet long by 205 feet wide and surrounded by a six-foot ditch, the henge was heavily overgrown until teams led by the Cornwall Archaeological Unit cleared the site over the winter. This allowed researchers from Historic England to survey the henge using remote sensing techniques such as ground penetrating radar, which identified seven buried stones composing a circle. This is only the second henge in Cornwall known to have a stone circle within its enclosure. To read about another recent Neolithic discovery in Cornwall, go to “By the Light of the Moon.”

Source: archaeology.org

Check Also

Soldiers of Bronze: The Greek Hoplite, the Phalanx, and the Battle that Defined Them

Hoplite comes from the Greek word “ta hopla,” which means “tool” or “equipment,” and was …

Leave a Reply