Recent Posts

U.S. Repatriates Pre-Hispanic Artifacts to Mexico

EL PASO, TEXAS—According to a statement released by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and National Park Service representatives handed over more than 500 stone artifacts to Mexican consul General Mauricio Ibarra Ponce de León at the Mexican Consulate last week. Special agents traced the smuggled knives, …

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Early Alphabet Spotted on Jar Fragment in Israel

VIENNA, AUSTRIA—Live Science reports that an inscription on a jar fragment unearthed at the site of Tel Lachish in south-central Israel could offer a missing link between early examples of alphabetic writing from Egypt and later writing samples found in the Levant. The Egyptian alphabet dates to the 12th Dynasty, …

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Neanderthal Nuclear DNA Found in Paleolithic Cave Sediments

An international team of scientists has developed new methods for the enrichment and analysis of nuclear DNA from sediments, and applied them to cave deposits in Europe and Siberia dated to between approximately 200,000 and 50,000 years ago. Vernot et al. extracted Neanderthal nuclear DNA from cave sediments. Image credit: …

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West Africans Hunted for Honey 3,500 Years Ago

Historical and ethnographic literature from across Africa suggests bee products, honey and larvae, had considerable importance both as a food source and in the making of honey-based drinks. To investigate this, a team of researchers from the University of Bristol and Goethe University analyzed lipid residues from 458 prehistoric pottery …

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4,000-Year-Old Carved Stone Slab is Europe’s Oldest Known Map

An intricately carved stone slab from the early Bronze Age found in France has been identified as the oldest cartographical representation of a known territory in Europe. The 4,000-year-old stone slab found in France. Image credit: Nicolas et al. The Bronze Age stone slab measures 3.86 m long and 2.1 …

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Aboriginal Australians Used Boomerangs as Retouchers

New research by Griffith University and University of Cape Town scientists provides the first traceological evidence of multipurpose nature of Australian hardwood boomerangs. Australian Luritja man demonstrating method of attack with boomerang under cover of shield, c. 1920. Image credit: National Museum of Australia. “Australian lithic assemblages contain a great …

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Archaeologists Discover ‘Lost Golden City’ in Egypt

An international team of archaeologists has uncovered a 3,300-year-old city in the southern province of Luxor in Egypt. The 3,300-year-old ruins of Aten in Egypt. Image credit: Zahi Hawass Center for Egyptology. The first remnants of the ancient city, known as Aten, were uncovered in September 2020 by a team …

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